Interests

Preferences for work environments and outcomes.

Holland Codes[xxvii]

Also referred to as RIASEC codes.

DescriptorDefinition
Realistic Realistic occupations are characterized by the dominance of activities that entail the explicit, ordered, or systematic manipulation of objects, tools, machines, and animals. Many of these occupations do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others. They foster technical competencies and achievements. Workers in these occupations have mechanical abilities, and see the world in simple, tangible, and traditional terms. They are rewarded in their work environment with the display of conventional values and goods: money, power, and possessions.
InvestigativeInvestigative occupations are characterized by the dominance of activities that entail the observation and symbolic, systematic, and creative investigation of physical, biological, or cultural phenomena. These occupations require an extensive amount of thinking and frequently involve working with ideas, searching for facts, and figuring out problems mentally. They encourage scientific competencies and achievements. Workers in those occupations are erudite, have mathematical and scientific abilities, and see the world in complex, abstract, independent, and original terms. They are rewarded in their work environment for the display of scientific values.
Artistic Artistic occupations are characterized by the dominance of free activities to create art products. These occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs, and patterns and often require self-expression and the accomplishment of work without following a clear set of rules. They foster artistic competencies and achievements. Workers in those occupations are expressive, original, intuitive, nonconforming, and independent. They have artistic abilities (acting, writing, speaking) and see the world in complex, independent, unconventional, and flexible terms. They are rewarded in their work environment for the display of artistic values.
Social Social occupations are characterized by the dominance of activities that entail the interaction with others to inform, train, develop, cure, or enlighten. These occupations often require helping or providing service to others and frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. They foster social competencies and achievements. Workers in those occupations like to help others, understand others, and are cooperative and social. They see the world in flexible terms. They are rewarded in their work environment for the display of social values.
Enterprising Enterprising occupations are characterized by the dominance of activities that entail the interaction with others to attain organizational or self-interest goals. They frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects, influencing, leading or mobilizing people and making decisions, and sometimes require risk taking and dealing with business. They foster enterprising competencies and achievements. Workers in those occupations are audacious, popular, self-confident, sociable, and possess leadership and speaking abilities. They see the world in terms of power, status, responsibility, and in stereotyped, dependent, and simple terms. They are rewarded in their work environment for the display of enterprising values and goals: money, power and status.
Conventional Conventional occupations are characterized by the dominance of activities that entail the explicit, ordered, and systematic manipulation of data, such as keeping records, filing materials, reproducing materials, organizing written and numerical data according to a prescribed plan, and operating business and data processing machines. They often require following a clear line of authority or set procedures and routines, and usually involve working with data and details more than with ideas. They foster clerical competencies and achievements. Workers in those occupations are conforming, orderly, and methodical. They see the world in conventional, stereotypical, constricted, simple, and dependant terms. They are rewarded in their work environment for the display of conventional values: money, dependability, conformity.

Canadian Work Preference Inventory

CWPI or DIMOS codes

DescriptorDefinition
Directive (D) Directive persons like to take charge and control situations. They like to take responsibility for projects that require planning, decision making, and coordinating the work of others. They are able to give direction and instructions easily. They enjoy organizing their own activities. They see themselves as independent and self-directing.
Innovative (I) Innovative persons like to explore things in depth and arrive at solutions to problems by experimenting. They are interested in initiating and creating different ways to solve questions and present information. They enjoy scientific subjects. Innovative persons prefer to be challenged with new and unexpected experiences. They adjust to change easily.
Methodical (M) Methodical persons like to have clear rules and organized methods to guide their activities. They prefer working under the direction or supervision of others according to given instructions, or to be guided by established policies and procedures. Methodical persons like to work on one thing until it is completed. They enjoy following a set routine and prefer work that is free from the unexpected.
Objective (O) Objective persons enjoy working with tools, equipment, instruments, and machinery. They like to repair and/or fabricate things from various materials according to specifications and using established techniques. Objective persons are interested in finding out how things operate and how they are built.
Social (S) Social persons like dealing with people. They enjoy caring for and assisting others in identifying their needs and solving their concerns. Social persons like working and co-operating with others. They prefer to be involved in work that requires interpersonal contact.
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