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Procurement and purchasing agents and officers

OaSIS code 12102.00

Procurement and purchasing agents and officers source and purchase general and specialized equipment, materials, business services and land or access rights for use or for further processing by their establishment.

Overview

Also known as

  • Contract management officer
  • Contracts officer
  • Energy asset surface land analyst
  • Furniture and furnishings purchaser
  • Government supply officer
  • Material management officer
  • Procurement officer
  • Purchasing agent
  • Sourcing specialist
  • Strategic sourcing analyst

Main duties

This group performs some or all of the following duties:

  • Procurement agents and officers
  • Evaluate risk, assess, prepare forecasts, scenarios and other factors concerning the supply market, and write reports and recommendations
  • Provides research and input into the financial sourcing aspects of contracts and calls for tender when information is not readily available
  • Identify high impact cost reduction opportunities
  • Leverage the organization’s buying power to optimize costs, access new suppliers, reduce lead times, and guarantee supply
  • Develop and maintain relationships with existing and potential buyers and suppliers to the organization
  • Respond to customer service inquiries and clarify requirements and provide information as needed.
  • Purchasing agents and officers
  • Purchase general and specialized equipment and materials, business services and land or access rights for use or for further processing by their establishment
  • Assess requirements of an establishment and develop specifications for equipment, materials and supplies to be purchased
  • Invite tenders, consult with suppliers and review quotations
  • Determine or negotiate contract terms and conditions, award supplier contracts or recommend contract awards
  • Establish logistics of delivery schedules, monitor progress and contact clients and suppliers to resolve problems
  • Negotiate land acquisition or access rights for public or private use, and may conduct field investigations of properties
  • May hire, train or supervise purchasing clerks.

Additional information

  • Progression to managerial positions is possible with experience.
  • Procurement and purchasing agents and officers may specialize in the purchase of particular materials or business services such as furniture or access rights.

Similar occupations classified elsewhere

Exclusions:

  • Purchasing managers (10012)
  • Purchasing and inventory control workers (14403)
  • Retail and wholesale buyers (62101)

NOC hierarchy breakdown

NOC version

NOC 2021 Version 1.0

Broad occupational category

1 – Business, finance and administration occupations

TEER

2 – Occupations usually require a college diploma or apprenticeship training of two or more years; or supervisory occupations

Major group

12 – Administrative and financial supervisors and specialized administrative occupations

Sub-major group

121 – Specialized administrative occupations

Minor group

1210 – Administrative and regulatory occupations

Unit group

12102 – Procurement and purchasing agents and officers

Occupational profile

12102.00 – Procurement and purchasing agents and officers

Work characteristics

Work characteristics gathers the various components describing the work environment of each occupation, such as employers, work activities, and the work context. Each category displays up to 10 descriptors in descending order based, firstly, on their attributed ratings by the level of complexity (for Work Activities) or other measurement dimensions (for Work Context), and secondly, in alphabetical order. The whole list of descriptors and their ratings can be expanded at the bottom of each page.

Work Activities

Proficiency or complexity level
Managing Resources
5 - Highest Level
Analyzing Data or Information
4 - High Level
Communicating with Coworkers
4 - High Level
Communicating with Persons Outside Organization
4 - High Level
Resolving Conflicts and Negotiating with Others
4 - High Level

Work Context

Structural Job Characteristics

Structured versus Unstructured Work
Degree of freedom to determine tasks and priorities
3 - Moderate amount of freedom
Work Week Duration
Worked hours in a typical week
2 - Between 35 to 40 hours

Physical Work Environment

Physical Proximity
Physical distance from others
3 - Somewhat close (e.g. share office)

Physical Demands

Sitting
Duration
4 - More than half the time
Standing
Duration
2 - Less than half the time
Bending or Twisting the Body
Duration
1 - Very little time

Interpersonal Relations

Contact with Others
Frequency
5 - Every day, almost continuously
Duration
5 - All the time, or almost all the time
Work with Work Group or Team
Importance
4 - Highly important
Frequency
3 - Once a week or more but not every day

Workplaces/employers

  • Establishements throughout the private and public sector

Skills and abilities

This section displays the various competencies required for an occupation. Each category displays up to 10 descriptors in descending order based, firstly, on their attributed ratings by the level of proficiency (for Skills and Abilities) or importance (for Personal Attributes) and secondly, in alphabetical order. The whole list of descriptors and their ratings can be expanded at the bottom of each page.

Abilities

Proficiency or complexity level
Verbal Ability
4 - High Level
Categorization Flexibility
3 - Moderate Level
Deductive Reasoning
3 - Moderate Level
Fluency of Ideas
3 - Moderate Level
Inductive Reasoning
3 - Moderate Level

Skills

Proficiency or complexity level
Negotiating
5 - Highest Level
Management of Financial Resources
4 - High Level
Management of Material Resources
4 - High Level
Persuading
4 - High Level
Coordinating
3 - Moderate Level

Personal Attributes

Importance
Attention to Detail
5 - Extremely important
Active Learning
4 - Highly important
Adaptability
4 - Highly important
Analytical Thinking
4 - Highly important
Collaboration
4 - Highly important