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Astronomers

OaSIS code 21100.02

Astronomers conduct observational and theoretical research to extend knowledge of the universe.

Overview

Also known as

  • Astronomer
  • Cosmologist
  • Radio astronomer

Main duties

This group performs some or all of the following duties:

  • Design and conduct observational surveys, conduct detailed analyses and develop numerical models to extend knowledge of celestial bodies and cosmic radiation
  • Develop or participate in the development of instrumentation and software for astronomical observation and analysis.

Additional information

  • Mobility between specializations within physics and within astronomy is possible with experience.
  • Mobility is possible to the fields of meteorology, geophysics and other fields of science.
  • Progression to management positions is possible with experience.
  • Astronomers may specialize in fields such as astrophysics, observational or optical astronomy and radio astronomy.

Similar occupations classified elsewhere

Exclusions:

  • Architecture and science managers (20011)
  • Computer engineers (except software engineers and designers) (21311)

NOC hierarchy breakdown

NOC version

NOC 2021 Version 1.0

Broad occupational category

2 – Natural and applied sciences and related occupations

TEER

1 – Occupations usually require a university degree

Major group

21 – Professional occupations in natural and applied sciences

Sub-major group

211 – Professional occupations in natural sciences

Minor group

2110 – Physical science professionals

Unit group

21100 – Physicists and astronomers

Occupational profile

21100.02 – Astronomers

Work characteristics

Work characteristics gathers the various components describing the work environment of each occupation, such as employers, work activities, and the work context. Each category displays up to 10 descriptors in descending order based, firstly, on their attributed ratings by the level of complexity (for Work Activities) or other measurement dimensions (for Work Context), and secondly, in alphabetical order. The whole list of descriptors and their ratings can be expanded at the bottom of each page.

Work Activities

Proficiency or complexity level
Analyzing Data or Information
5 - Highest Level
Applying New Knowledge
5 - Highest Level
Clerical Activities
5 - Highest Level
Communicating with Persons Outside Organization
5 - Highest Level
Estimating the Quantifiable Characteristics
5 - Highest Level

Work Context

Structural Job Characteristics

Structured versus Unstructured Work
Degree of freedom to determine tasks and priorities
4 - High amount of freedom
Work Week Duration
Worked hours in a typical week
2 - Between 35 to 40 hours

Physical Work Environment

Physical Proximity
Physical distance from others
3 - Somewhat close (e.g. share office)

Physical Demands

Sitting
Duration
4 - More than half the time
Standing
Duration
2 - Less than half the time
Bending or Twisting the Body
Duration
1 - Very little time

Interpersonal Relations

Contact with Others
Frequency
3 - Once a week or more but not every day
Duration
3 - About half the time
Work with Work Group or Team
Importance
3 - Important
Frequency
3 - Once a week or more but not every day

Workplaces/employers

  • Governments
  • Universities

Skills and abilities

This section displays the various competencies required for an occupation. Each category displays up to 10 descriptors in descending order based, firstly, on their attributed ratings by the level of proficiency (for Skills and Abilities) or importance (for Personal Attributes) and secondly, in alphabetical order. The whole list of descriptors and their ratings can be expanded at the bottom of each page.

Abilities

Proficiency or complexity level
Categorization Flexibility
5 - Highest Level
Deductive Reasoning
5 - Highest Level
Far Vision
5 - Highest Level
Inductive Reasoning
5 - Highest Level
Information Ordering
5 - Highest Level

Skills

Proficiency or complexity level
Critical Thinking
5 - Highest Level
Digital Literacy
5 - Highest Level
Learning and Teaching Strategies
5 - Highest Level
Numeracy
5 - Highest Level
Oral Communication: Oral Comprehension
5 - Highest Level

Personal Attributes

Importance
Active Learning
5 - Extremely important
Analytical Thinking
5 - Extremely important
Attention to Detail
5 - Extremely important
Independence
5 - Extremely important
Innovativeness
4 - Highly important