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Geoscientists

OaSIS code 21102.01

Geoscientists include geologists, geochemists and geophysicists who conduct programs of exploration and research to extend knowledge of the structure, composition and processes of the earth, to locate, identify and extract hydrocarbon, mineral and groundwater resources and to assess and mitigate the effects of development and waste disposal projects on the environment.

Overview

Also known as

  • Geochemist
  • Geologist
  • Geophysicist
  • Glaciologist
  • Mine geologist
  • Mineralogist

Main duties

This group performs some or all of the following duties:

  • Conduct theoretical and applied research to extend knowledge of surface and subsurface features of the earth, its history and the operation of physical, chemical and biological systems that control its evolution
  • Plan, direct and participate in geological, geochemical and geophysical field studies, drilling and geological testing programs
  • Plan and conduct seismic, geodetic, electromagnetic, magnetic, gravimetric, radiometric, radar and other remote sensing programs
  • Plan, direct and participate in analyses of geological, geochemical and geophysical survey data, well logs and other test results, maps, notes and cross sections
  • Develop models and applied software for the analysis and interpretation of data
  • Plan and conduct analytical studies of core samples, drill cuttings and rock samples to identify chemical, mineral, hydrocarbon and biological composition and to assess depositional environments and geological age
  • Assess the size, orientation and composition of mineral ore bodies and hydrocarbon deposits
  • Identify deposits of construction materials and determine their characteristics and suitability for use as concrete aggregates, road fill or for other applications
  • Conduct geological and geophysical studies for regional development and advise in areas such as site selection, waste management and restoration of contaminated sites
  • Recommend the acquisition of lands, exploration and mapping programs and mine development
  • Identify and advise on anticipated natural risks such as slope erosion, landslides, soil instability, subsidence, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions
  • May supervise and coordinate well drilling, completion and work-overs and mining activities.

Additional information

  • Mobility between specializations in this group is possible with experience.
  • Progression to supervisory or higher level positions is possible with experience in this unit group.
  • Advancement to management positions in mining, petroleum and other industries is possible with experience.
  • Geologists may specialize in fields such as coal geology, environmental geology, geochronology, hydrogeology, mineral deposits or mining, petroleum geology, stratigraphy, tectonics, volcanology or in other fields.
  • Geochemists may specialize in analytical geochemistry, hydrogeochemistry, mineral or petroleum geochemistry or in other fields.
  • Geophysicists may specialize in areas, such as petroleum geology, earth physics, geodesy, geoelectromagnetism, seismology or in other fields.

Similar occupations classified elsewhere

Exclusions:

  • Architecture and science managers (20011)
  • Physicists and astronomers (21100)
  • Chemists (21101)
  • Biologists and related scientists (21110)
  • Geological engineers (21331)
  • Managers in natural resources production and fishing (80010)

NOC hierarchy breakdown

NOC version

NOC 2021 Version 1.0

Broad occupational category

2 – Natural and applied sciences and related occupations

TEER

1 – Occupations usually require a university degree

Major group

21 – Professional occupations in natural and applied sciences

Sub-major group

211 – Professional occupations in natural sciences

Minor group

2110 – Physical science professionals

Unit group

21102 – Geoscientists and oceanographers

Occupational profile

21102.01 – Geoscientists

Work characteristics

Work characteristics gathers the various components describing the work environment of each occupation, such as employers, work activities, and the work context. Each category displays up to 10 descriptors in descending order based, firstly, on their attributed ratings by the level of complexity (for Work Activities) or other measurement dimensions (for Work Context), and secondly, in alphabetical order. The whole list of descriptors and their ratings can be expanded at the bottom of each page.

Work Activities

Proficiency or complexity level
Analyzing Data or Information
5 - Highest Level
Clerical Activities
5 - Highest Level
Estimating the Quantifiable Characteristics
5 - Highest Level
Getting Information
5 - Highest Level
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events
5 - Highest Level

Work Context

Structural Job Characteristics

Structured versus Unstructured Work
Degree of freedom to determine tasks and priorities
4 - High amount of freedom
Work Week Duration
Worked hours in a typical week
2 - Between 35 to 40 hours

Physical Work Environment

Physical Proximity
Physical distance from others
3 - Somewhat close (e.g. share office)

Physical Demands

Sitting
Duration
3 - About half the time
Standing
Duration
3 - About half the time
Bending or Twisting the Body
Duration
1 - Very little time

Interpersonal Relations

Contact with Others
Frequency
3 - Once a week or more but not every day
Duration
3 - About half the time
Work with Work Group or Team
Importance
3 - Important
Frequency
3 - Once a week or more but not every day

Workplaces/employers

  • Consulting engineering, geology and geophysics firms
  • Education institutions
  • Governments
  • Mining and petroleum companies
  • Self-employed

Skills and abilities

This section displays the various competencies required for an occupation. Each category displays up to 10 descriptors in descending order based, firstly, on their attributed ratings by the level of proficiency (for Skills and Abilities) or importance (for Personal Attributes) and secondly, in alphabetical order. The whole list of descriptors and their ratings can be expanded at the bottom of each page.

Abilities

Proficiency or complexity level
Categorization Flexibility
5 - Highest Level
Mathematical Reasoning
5 - Highest Level
Written Comprehension
5 - Highest Level
Written Expression
5 - Highest Level
Deductive Reasoning
4 - High Level

Skills

Proficiency or complexity level
Digital Literacy
5 - Highest Level
Numeracy
5 - Highest Level
Oral Communication: Oral Comprehension
5 - Highest Level
Oral Communication: Oral Expression
5 - Highest Level
Problem Solving
5 - Highest Level

Personal Attributes

Importance
Analytical Thinking
5 - Extremely important
Attention to Detail
5 - Extremely important
Adaptability
4 - Highly important
Collaboration
4 - Highly important
Independence
4 - Highly important