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Data entry clerks

OaSIS code 14111.00

Data entry clerks input coded, statistical, financial and other information into computerized databases, spreadsheets or other templates using a keyboard, mouse, or optical scanner, speech recognition software or other data entry tools.

Overview

Also known as

  • Data control clerk
  • Data entry operator
  • Data input clerk
  • Data processor
  • Payment entry clerk

Main duties

This group performs some or all of the following duties:

  • Receive and register invoices, forms, records and other documents for data capture
  • Input data into computerized databases, spreadsheets or other templates using a keyboard, mouse, or optical scanner, speech recognition software or other data entry tools
  • Import and/or export data between different kinds of software
  • Verify accuracy and completeness of data
  • Identify, label and organize electronic storage media
  • Maintain libraries of electronic storage media.

Additional information

  • Progression to senior positions is possible with experience.

Similar occupations classified elsewhere

Exclusions:

  • Supervisors, general office and administrative support workers (12010)
  • General office support workers (14100)

NOC hierarchy breakdown

NOC version

NOC 2021 Version 1.0

Broad occupational category

1 – Business, finance and administration occupations

TEER

4 – Occupations usually require a secondary school diploma; or several weeks of on-the-job training

Major group

14 – Administrative and financial support and supply chain logistics occupations

Sub-major group

141 – Office, court, and data support occupations

Minor group

1411 – Survey, statistical and data entry occupations

Unit group

14111 – Data entry clerks

Occupational profile

14111.00 – Data entry clerks

Work characteristics

Work characteristics gathers the various components describing the work environment of each occupation, such as employers, work activities, and the work context. Each category displays up to 10 descriptors in descending order based, firstly, on their attributed ratings by the level of complexity (for Work Activities) or other measurement dimensions (for Work Context), and secondly, in alphabetical order. The whole list of descriptors and their ratings can be expanded at the bottom of each page.

Work Activities

Proficiency or complexity level
Clerical Activities
4 - High Level
Processing Information
4 - High Level
Interacting with Computers
3 - Moderate Level
Analyzing Data or Information
2 - Low Level
Applying New Knowledge
2 - Low Level

Work Context

Structural Job Characteristics

Structured versus Unstructured Work
Degree of freedom to determine tasks and priorities
2 - Low amount of freedom
Work Week Duration
Worked hours in a typical week
2 - Between 35 to 40 hours

Physical Work Environment

Physical Proximity
Physical distance from others
3 - Somewhat close (e.g. share office)

Physical Demands

Sitting
Duration
5 - All the time, or almost all the time
Standing
Duration
1 - Very little time
Bending or Twisting the Body
Duration
1 - Very little time

Interpersonal Relations

Contact with Others
Frequency
3 - Once a week or more but not every day
Duration
3 - About half the time
Work with Work Group or Team
Importance
2 - Somewhat important
Frequency
2 - Once a month or more but not every week

Workplaces/employers

  • Establishements throughout the private and public sector

Skills and abilities

This section displays the various competencies required for an occupation. Each category displays up to 10 descriptors in descending order based, firstly, on their attributed ratings by the level of proficiency (for Skills and Abilities) or importance (for Personal Attributes) and secondly, in alphabetical order. The whole list of descriptors and their ratings can be expanded at the bottom of each page.

Abilities

Proficiency or complexity level
Finger-Hand-Wrist Motion
3 - Moderate Level
Information Ordering
3 - Moderate Level
Near Vision
3 - Moderate Level
Perceptual Speed
3 - Moderate Level
Arm-Hand Steadiness
2 - Low Level

Skills

Proficiency or complexity level
Evaluation
2 - Low Level
Learning and Teaching Strategies
2 - Low Level
Numeracy
2 - Low Level
Oral Communication: Active Listening
2 - Low Level
Oral Communication: Oral Comprehension
2 - Low Level

Personal Attributes

Importance
Attention to Detail
5 - Extremely important
Collaboration
4 - Highly important
Active Learning
3 - Important
Adaptability
3 - Important
Analytical Thinking
3 - Important