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5136.3 – Art instructors and teachers

Art instructors and teachers teach techniques and methods used in artistic expression to art students.

Profile

Example titles Help

  • Art teacher (except primary, secondary and post-secondary education)

Main characteristics Help

  • General learning ability to plan programs of study according to the interests and abilities of students, and to analyze students' capabilities and training needs
  • Verbal ability to prepare and deliver lectures on history and theory of art, and to offer advice, criticism and encouragement
  • Spatial perception to visualize and depict three-dimensional objects and arrangements and to choose objects for art lessons
  • Form perception to assess students' work
  • Motor co-ordination and Finger dexterity to manipulate materials when demonstrating techniques
  • Directive interest in synthesizing information to teach students the techniques and methods of drawing, painting, sculpting and other forms of artistic expression; and in preparing and assigning special exercises, advising on selection of materials and equipment to use and grading students' work
  • Objective interest in precision working to demonstrate use of materials for paintings, ceramics, sculpture and other forms of art
  • Methodical interest in instructing students; and in providing audio-visual teaching aids and arranging for tours of art galleries, museums and exhibitions of students' work

Aptitudes Help

One of five levels assigned for each factor, with levels representing normal curve distribution of the labour force:

G
General learning ability
V
Verbal ability
N
Numerical ability
S
Spatial perception
P
Form perception
Q
Clerical perception
K
Motor co-ordination
F
Finger dexterity
M
Manual dexterity

Levels legend
  1. The highest 10% of the working population
  2. Upper third, exclusive of the highest 10%
  3. Middle third of the working population
  4. Lowest third, exclusive of the lowest 10%
  5. Lowest 10% of the working population

An individual's overall capacity to learn the skills needed to perform job duties is based on his or her specific aptitudes for acquiring information and transforming it into action.

General learning ability G-2

Ability to 'catch on' or understand instructions and underlying principles; to reason and make judgments.

Verbal ability V-2

Ability to understand the meaning of words and the ideas associated with them, and to use them effectively; to comprehend language, to understand relationships between words and to understand the meaning of whole sentences and paragraphs; to present information or ideas clearly.

Numerical ability N-4

Ability to carry out arithmetical processes quickly and accurately.

Spatial perception S-2

Ability to think visually about geometric forms and comprehend the two dimensional representation of three dimensional objects; to recognize the relationships resulting from the movement of objects in space. May be used in such tasks as blueprint reading and in solving geometry problems. Frequently described as the ability to 'visualize' objects of two or three dimensions.

Form perception P-2

Ability to perceive pertinent detail in objects and in pictorial and graphic material; to make visual comparisons and discriminations and to see slight differences in shapes and shadings of figures and widths and lengths of lines.

Clerical perception Q-4

Ability to perceive pertinent detail in verbal or tabular material; to observe differences in copy, to proofread words and numbers, and to avoid perceptual errors in arithmetical computation.

Motor co-ordination K-2

Ability to co-ordinate eyes, hands and fingers rapidly and accurately when required to respond with precise movements.

Finger dexterity F-2

Ability to move the fingers and manipulate small objects with the fingers rapidly and/or accurately.

Manual dexterity M-3

Ability to move the hands easily and skillfully; to work with the hands in placing and turning motions.

Interests Help

Three of five descriptive factors, assigned in order of predominance and lower case rating indicating weaker representation:

D
Directive
I
Innovative
M
Methodical
O
Objective
S
Social

Directive D

Directive persons like to take charge and control situations. They like to take responsibility for projects that require planning, decision making and co-ordinating the work of others. They are able to give direction and instructions easily. They enjoy organizing their own activities. They see themselves as independent and self-directing.

Objective O

Objective persons enjoy working with tools, equipment, instruments and machinery. They like to repair and/or fabricate things from various materials according to specifications and using established techniques. Objective persons are interested in finding out how things operate and how they are built.

Methodical M

Methodical persons like to have clear rules and organized methods to guide their activities. They prefer working under the direction or supervision of others according to given instructions, or to be guided by established policies and procedures. Methodical persons like to work on one thing until it is completed. They enjoy following a set routine and prefer work that is free from the unexpected.

Data, people, and things Help

Data

0
Synthesizing
1
Co-ordinating
2
Analyzing
3
Compiling
4
Computing
5
Copying
6
Comparing
7
N/A
8
Not Significant

People

0
Mentoring
1
Negotiating
2
Instructing - Consulting
3
Supervising
4
Diverting
5
Persuading
6
Speaking - Signaling
7
Serving - Assisting
8
Not significant

Things

0
Setting up
1
Precision working
2
Controlling
3
Driving - Operating
4
Operating - Manipulating
5
Tending
6
Feeding - Offbearing
7
Handling
8
Not significant
Data Synthesizing 0

Integrating analyses of data to discover facts and/or develop knowledge, concepts and interpretations.

People Instructing 2

Teaching subject matter to others, giving advice or training others (including animals) through explanation, demonstration and supervised practice; making recommendations on the basis of subject matter expertise.

Things Precision working 1

Using the body and/or equipment to move, guide, place, install and/or interface with objects, in order to attain specifications and precise standards. Considerable judgment is required to select, adjust and utilize appropriate tools, products and/or materials to accomplish specified objectives.

Physical activities Help

V - Vision

1
Close visual acuity
2
Near vision
3
Near and far vision
4
Total visual field

H - Hearing

1
Limited
2
Verbal interaction
3
Other sound discrimination

L - Limb co-ordination

0
Not relevant
1
Upper limb co-ordination
2
Multiple limb co-ordination

C - Colour discrimination

0
Not relevant
1
Relevant

B - Body position

1
Sitting
2
Standing and/or walking
3
Sitting, standing, walking
4
Other body positions

S - Strength

1
Limited
2
Light
3
Medium
4
Heavy
Vision Vision V-3

The use of sight in the work performed. The levels are organized in terms of the visual field involved in the performance of the work.

3 - Near and far vision

Some work activities involve the monitoring of processes, objects or situations in the work environment that are far from the worker. Other work activities involve Near vision (2).

Examples:

  • installing shingles/tiles on roofs
  • conducting surveys to establish legal property boundaries
  • developing trading strategies by monitoring market conditions from the exchange floor
Colour discrimination Colour discrimination C-1

The use of colour descrimination to identify, distinguish and match colours and different shades of the same colours.

1 - Relevant

Colour discrimination is relevant in the performance of the work.

Examples:

  • observing signals while operating vehicles
  • installing, testing and repairing electrical wiring
  • restoring and conserving museum and art gallery artifacts
  • designing, constructing and repairing dentures
Hearing Hearing H-2

The use of hearing in the work performed. The levels are organized in terms of the type of auditory discrimination involved in the performance of the work.

2 - Verbal interaction

Work activities involve communication with colleagues, clients and/or the public on a regular basis.

Examples:

  • operating directory listing systems to provide directory assistance to customers
  • resolving work problems and recommending measures to improve productivity
  • consulting with families of the deceased regarding funeral services
  • analyzing and providing advice on managerial methods and organization of establishments
Body position Body position B-3

Primary type of posture or body movement involved in performing the work. These postures or body movements range from simple to complex and from sedentary to mobile.

3 - Sitting, standing, walking

This level involves work activities in combinations and varying degrees of Sitting (1) and Standing and/or walking (2).

Examples:

  • teaching students through lectures, discussions, audio-visual presentations and field studies
  • assessing land values for taxation purposes
  • ensuring that systems and equipment are operating efficiently on job sites
  • supervising and co-ordinating the activities of workers who cut or stitch fabric, fur or leather garments
Limb co-ordination Limb co-ordination L-1

The use of limbs in performing work.

1 - Upper limb co-ordination

Work activities involve co-ordination of upper limbs.

Examples:

  • keyboarding
  • performing maintenance services such as oil changes, lubrications and tune-ups
  • operating video cameras
  • instructing students in sign language
Strength Strength S-1

The use of strength in the handling of loads such as pulling, pushing, lifting and/or moving objects during the work performed.

1 - Limited

Work activities involve handling loads up to 5 kg.

Examples:

  • examining and analyzing financial information
  • selling insurance to clients
  • conducting economic and technical feasibility studies
  • administering and marking written tests

Environmental conditions Help

Location

L1
Regulated inside climate
L2
Unregulated inside climate
L3
Outside
L4
In a vehicle or cab

Hazards

H1
Dangerous chemical substances
H2
Biological agents
H3
Equipment, machinery, tools
H4
Electricity
H5
Radiation
H6
Flying particles, falling objects
H7
Fire, steam, hot surfaces
H8
Dangerous locations

Discomforts

D1
Noise
D2
Vibration
D3
Odours
D4
Non-toxic dusts
D5
Wetness
Discomforts Odours D3

Work conditions that create disturbances but are not hazardous. In general, these conditions create discomfort, but are not direct sources of injury. In extreme instances, however, these conditions might cause injury.

D3 - Odours

The presence of noxious, intense or prolonged odours in the work environment.

Examples:

  • cooking meals
  • colouring, waving and styling hair
  • preserving and sanitizing human remains
  • using industrial cleaning solutions
  • preparing standard cuts of meat, poultry and fish products for sale
Discomforts Non-toxic dusts D4

Work conditions that create disturbances but are not hazardous. In general, these conditions create discomfort, but are not direct sources of injury. In extreme instances, however, these conditions might cause injury.

D4 - Non-toxic dusts

The presence of non-poisonous airborne particles such as textile dust, flour, sand, sawdust and feathers in the work environment.

Examples:

  • preparing dough or batter
  • cutting fur pelts or fabric for garments
  • operating woodworking machines
  • cleaning chimneys
  • removing poultry feathers
Hazards Equipment, machinery, tools H3

Potential hazards to which the worker may be exposed. The codes provide an indication of the type(s) of hazard(s) most likely to be present in the workplace environment. They are not a measure of frequency, duration or degree of exposure to hazards, but an indication of the presence or absence of a particular hazard in the work environment.

H3 - Equipment, machinery, tools

Working near or with equipment, instruments, machinery or power/hand tools that may be a potential source of accident or injury.

Examples:

  • operating metal machining tools to shape metal
  • using hand tools to fabricate wood products
  • operating power saws to thin trees
  • performing surgical procedures
Hazards Flying particles, falling objects H6

Potential hazards to which the worker may be exposed. The codes provide an indication of the type(s) of hazard(s) most likely to be present in the workplace environment. They are not a measure of frequency, duration or degree of exposure to hazards, but an indication of the presence or absence of a particular hazard in the work environment.

H6 - Flying particles, falling objects

Exposure to flying particles and falling objects in the work environment that pose the risk of bodily injury.Flying particles refer to particles such as wood chips, metal particles and rock chips generated by the handling, crushing, grinding, rapid impact or explosion of materials.

Examples:

  • operating machining tools such as lathes/grinders
  • constructing underground installations in mines using hand and power tools
  • operating chain saws to fell, delimb and buck trees
  • operating hoisting devices to load cargo onto ships
  • laying brick to construct or repair walls
Location Regulated inside climate L1

The work performed is carried out indoors in a regulated environment, indoors in an unregulated environment, outdoors or in a vehicle. In many occupations, the Main Duties may be performed in more than one location. Therefore, a group may have more than one Location code, for example:

  • firefighting and fire prevention duties
  • maintenance of interior/exterior of buildings
  • managing operations and paperwork of farms

L1 - Regulated inside climate

A normal controlled environment such as an office, hospital or school.

Employment requirements Help

Education/training Help

1
No formal education or training requirements
2
Some high school education and/or on the job training or experience
3
High school
4
Course work, training, workshops and/or experience related to the occupation
5
Apprenticeship, specialized training, vocational school training
6
College, technical school (certificate, diploma)
7
Undergraduate degree
8
Post-graduate or professional degree
+
Additional requirement beyond education and training
R
Regulated requirement(s)
1+, 5+, 6+, 7+
  • Creative ability and talent, as demonstrated by a portfolio of work, and knowledge of the safe use of materials, tools and equipment are required. Art programs are offered at universities, colleges and private art schools.
  • Art instructors and teachers may be required to have a university degree or college diploma in a field related to art.

Workplaces/employers Help

  • Art schools
  • Self-employment
  • Colleges
  • Universities

Exclusions Help

Remarks Help

  • For this occupation, Discomforts D3 and D4(Odours and Non-toxic dusts), Hazards H3 and H6(Equipment, machinery, tools and Flying particles, falling objects) may also apply.

Breakdown summary

Broad occupational category
5 – Occupations in art, culture, recreation and sport
Skill level
A – Occupations usually require university education
Major group
51 – Professional occupations in art and culture
Minor group
513 – Creative and performing artists
Unit group
5136 – Painters, sculptors and other visual artists
Version
2016.3
Date modified: